Tuesday, 31 March 2009

ARTHUR RACKHAM

When looking through fairytale books nowadays, I can't help but noticing just how hideous most illustrations are. There are various illustration trends, all of them equally ugly: the "postmodern" illustration, usually made very obviously by computer and which just looks "fake", the "naive" illustration, which looks like the illustrator thinks children are idiots, or the "arty" illustration, of which I'd rather not speak. All those self-proclaimed illustrators should just look back to the ultimate classic of fairytale illustration (we all remember his Peter Pan and Alice in Wonderland versions), Arthur Rackham. His style, between Preraphaelite and Art Nouveau was simple, detailed, narrative, with a very airy and free trace that makes us think his characters are in a world which has less gravity. In his work, fairies and other characters, subtle and fragile but still real, bathe in the rare light of fantasy. I am not a big fan of fairies, trolls and gnomes, still Arthur Rackham's illustrations make me dream...

5 Comments:

Blogger Kwak said...

Me recuerda mucho a las ilustraciones de Alphonse Mucha en los tonos y las formas que emplea.
Tienes razón en eso de que hoy en día toman a los niños por idiotas, no hay más que ver las series de animación que les ponen en televisión... Mejor callarse...

31 March 2009 at 17:23  
OpenID Fife said...

Indeed, indeed, Ignatius... (no, en serio, me encanta el post. Y las ilustraciones!!)

1 April 2009 at 13:41  
Blogger DON'T SWEAT IT said...

Such detailed, yet delicate, illustrations. When I was little, I had an extraordinary obsession with fairies.

10 April 2009 at 17:20  
Blogger Fleur-de-Lis said...

Absolutely gorgeous! I also admire the draws of Brian Foud, Rien Poortvliet (who draw the magnificent illustrations for The Gnome's book) and Tony Wolf (Stories of the Forest)^^ now i have one more to my list

Kiss by Fleur de Lis

18 November 2009 at 16:54  
Blogger Lizardscruff said...

I miss illustrations like these. I want so badly to help turn modern illustration back to it's roots.

13 July 2010 at 09:05  

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